The Do’s and Dont’s of Email Marketing

Email marketing is the cornerstone of a good content marketing campaign. If it’s done right the ROI is one of the best in the industry. If done wrong it’s a colossal waste of time. Out of all the tips I am giving this week the two most important are to be consistent and to be useful. People should know when your email will be coming and they should know there will be at least one piece of new and useful content. That is how you build your list and how you prevent subscriber drop off. Here is an infographic with more tips for you.

Do and dont of email campaign

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Welcome to the Pro’s

I was chatting with a client about finding more people that needed my help and they struck on a good point. I give out great general advice but know much more than is seen on my blog so why not give out a pro tip that I normally wouldn’t give unless you were one of my clients. It sounded like a good idea to me so I put together this infographic on reaching the C-suite. This still isn’t everything I know on the subject but will give a good idea of why you might want me as your business coach. I have been navigating the business world for over a quarter of a century and have run into many of the problems business owners face. Beyond that my list of connections is pretty substantial so if I don’t immediately know the answer to your problems it’s likely I know someone who does. For now, enjoy this pro-level infographic and send me an email or give me a call if you are ready to take the next step to help your business. Jason@jasonmporter.com (435)554-8209

Cold Calling the C-Suite

Netwoking Week is Back!

I can never stress the importance of networking enough so here comes another week full of tips and training. If you need some one-on-one coaching on this topic make sure to reach out. Your tip for today is to ask questions. Ask at least 3-4 questions for every bit of information you give out. “I help small businesses with their social media” What do you do?” What is your ideal client?” “What can I do today to help your business?” Networking is more about giving than receiving.

Successful Entrepreneurs make networking a priority

Simple Customer Service (or How to lose a customer for $0.30)

It’s a well-known statistic that a happy customer tells 9 people on average and an unhappy customer tells 16. Unfortunately, if you provide poor customer service to a marketer they are likely to turn it into a lesson for thousands. Every company I know is constantly looking for new customers but it is always cheaper to retain the ones you have. On average it is 6-7 times more expensive to get a new customer than to keep an old one. How do you keep them? Most cases it is all about the customer experience. Today is a lesson on flexibility during the customer experience.

The short version of the story is that a popular fast food chain had an advertisement on the menu board showing the price of an Italian sub. The main menu board had a different price. The manager was already at the register due to an issue with the computer freezing while taking my groups order. The discrepancy was pointed out, he said there was no difference in the sub so a member of my group ordered the cheaper version. Of course, the more expensive version was what was in the computer. No problem, punch in the discount, change the difference, reduce the price down to the advertised price right? Wrong, apparently corporate sets the prices in the computer and the manager can’t do anything about it. Let me repeat that, the manager has no control to give customers the price they are advertising on the menu board. He absolutely refused to give the reduced price. It was a matter of $0.30. Lost a loyal customer for $0.30 due to inflexibility. Not to mention the company, famous for its social media work, has ignored the post pointing it out all day. Granted, it’s a big company, but when your business is tagged in the same post as #customerservicefail, you might want to be paying attention. Now there’s a couple tweets, a blog post, two Facebook posts and a spot in an upcoming lecture. All this fuss for $.030? Well, yes, it’s my $0.30. If I spent $0.30 more on every transaction through a year when I wasn’t supposed to I would lose a couple hundred dollars. It eventually adds up so I tend to be aware when I am not paying the advertised price. Plus I feel such tactics are underhanded and it makes me feel unappreciated when a company thinks it’s ok to overcharge their customers.

 

The lesson is about flexibility. The customer doesn’t want to hear what corporate policy is. The customer doesn’t want to hear what you can’t do. Tell them what you can do, what the solution is. In simple cases like a price screw up, get them the advertised price. If it is truly against policy and there is no way you can change something, tell them what solutions you can provide, not what you can’t. Don’t hide behind policy and procedures, it’s bad customer service.

 

Arbys fixed
Of course, as we ate the manager “fixed” the problem.